InvestEd 2015
Dividend Investing: Is it for You?
Creating Fake Email Addresses with MailDrop



InvestEd 2015

Richmond VA, June 12-14, 2015
Westin Richmond
Register Now!

 
If you haven't attended an InvestEd conference, feedback from conference attendees will encourage you to attend this year. Attendees of last year's conference provide compelling reasons why you should attend:

"I've been a member of an investment club for 17 years and have attended several conferences in the past. I'm so happy I attended this year. I learned something new from every class. Every teacher was a wealth of information and totally available to chat with between classes and at meals. From what I could tell, the conference was seamless. Every meal was delicious and the facility was wonderful. Worth every penny. With the speed that technology moves it is important to have access to a group that is keeping up with the changes and willing to share. I'm looking forward to learning more about options. Thank you!" – Diann

"Bonus sessions on Friday are a great update on the tech world." – George

"The best bang for your bucks." – Teri

"The Newbie program was helpful even though I've been doing this off/on since 1982." – Barb

"InvestEd shows investors how to combine both fundamental and technical analysis so they can better meet their financial goals. Next time I will venture more boldly into topics in which I have no familiarity, options and technical analysis. I seemed to already know the topics I attended." – Linda


Review the conference curriculum and register today. Our guest room rate is $119 plus tax. Come early or stay late and take a mini-vacation in historic Richmond. Local attractions are featured on the Tourism page.

  

Dividend Investing: Is it for You?

Sandy Gallemore
 
Should I seek out stocks that pay a nice dividend? Is looking for the highest yield the thing to do? But, shouldn't a company be using its cash to reinvest in its business and make it grow rather than sharing that cash with me, the investor? Hmm.…
 
A dividend may be thought of as a convenient and periodic way for investors to share in corporate profits. While some companies, such as Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), are required by law to provide distributions to investors, other companies choose to pay a dividend because they wish to reward the investors, or they want to maintain their investor base by using the dividend to encourage investors to continue to hold the stock. Typically, these dividend-paying companies are mature, stable companies without a need for that cash to grow the company. If the company is paying out significant yield, the result is that the company will have a limited amount of cash available for expansion and growth of the company. Of course, the investor in such a company will want to check the financial documents of the company to be certain the company is able to afford the dividend.

If a company is paying out 75 percent or more of its cash in dividends, that company may be thought of as a high-yielding investment. If the company suffers a bad quarter or two, it has little room to maintain its dividend. The size of this company may have an impact on whether or not the investor decides to accept the risk. A company with a very large stockpile of cash likely will present a less risky situation than a smaller company with limited cash that is paying the high dividend.
 
Companies paying out less than 50 percent of available cash are much more capable of sustaining a couple of bad quarters than are the higher-yield companies. In addition, companies paying a reasonable dividend have adequate room to increase that dividend on a continuous basis, whereas the companies paying out a large dividend have little room to increase the dividend.
 
When looking at high-yield equity risk, the investor must consider the current fundamentals of the company, the sustainability of the dividend, and the future expectations of the company's growth, stability, and cash flows. Will the company be able to continue paying the dividend at the current percentage? What do the next eight to ten years look like for the company? What are the competitive advantages for this company? The investor needs to do some research to make a judgment about the company.
 
Looking for the highest yielding stocks may not be the best strategy for the average investor. While the yield will be good, if the stock price sags, the yield percentage will increase. The risk the investor faces is that the company may come to a point where it cannot continue to pay that dividend. If this company gets into financial trouble, not only will the dividend go away, but the company may completely go out of business, leaving the investor holding worthless stock. If a stock boasts that it offers a 10 percent dividend yield, alarm bells should ring. Maintaining such a high yield level most likely is unsustainable. Do your homework. Check the financial statements before investing.

Learn more about dividend investing at InvestEd 2015 in Richmond, Virginia, June 12-14. Don Cassidy will present a session on Income Vehicles off the Charts: Understanding REITs and MLPs, Pam Wilkes will present a session on Dividend Growth Investing, and John Diercks will present a session on High Yield Investments.
 
Sandy is an InvestEd Inc. director and serves as vice president for education. She is lead editor and prepares the general program brochure for the conference. Sandy has helped form investment clubs, presented introductory investing programs, and taught stock study and mutual fund classes at local, regional, and national events. In her leisure time she participates in a line dance group, plays handbells, bridge, and golf, and enjoys a variety of other activities, including investing. Sandy is professor emeritus of kinesiology, Georgia Southern University.
 


 

Creating Fake Email Addresses with MailDrop

Sandy Gallemore
 

Want to be anonymous when sending an email? Yes, you can do that. Just create a fake email address.
 
Maybe you want to view content on a page that lets you do that only if you sign up for a newsletter you don't want. Maybe you want to play a game online and are hesitant to do so because the website wants your email address. Maybe you are just signing up for a freebie. Maybe you are concerned that giving a website your email address will just bring more spam because the website will share your email address with its sponsors.
 
Plenty of reasons exist for you to want to provide an email address other than your main email address, particularly when the only reason you need to provide an email address is to satisfy the requirements to access content on a website. A number of sites are available for creating a fake email address. The website MailDrop is a popular choice for letting you create a temporary, disposable email address to protect your privacy. You simply create your personal address that will go in front of @maildrop.cc. A suggestion for selecting an email address is to include the name of the site or app in the address itself. So, you may create a prefix for your address such as GolfClubSale.eBay1@maildrop.cc. Being selective in creating your email address will help you know which sites may be ones you wish to visit again, ones not responding with any spam. Also, this will help you identify incoming mail before opening it.

You will want to keep in mind that your MailDrop mailbox is a public inbox in that anyone who knows your email address is able to check the contents of your inbox. This means the user should be certain no sensitive or private messages are sent using MailDrop. Creating a prefix for your email address that has something unique to you may be a good idea. I typed in a fake email for myself. When I clicked on it, my email showed across the top of the page, and the image below showed beneath that. The alias addresses that MailDrop composes seem to be sufficiently strong that they could be used with confidence, should the one I created not be unique enough for me to feel secure.



MailDrop is free with no registration, sign in, or password required. Your inbox is able to hold a maximum of 10 messages, so those messages you do not need to save should be deleted to make room for new messages. If a particular inbox does not receive a message for 24 hours, all of the messages in the inbox will be deleted automatically. The content of messages is monitored, and no messages dealing with illegal activities are permitted. Messages must be in plain text or HTML and may be no longer than 100k in length. No attachments are permitted.

Do not expect security or privacy with MailDrop inboxes. If you use the temporary email for a particular website and later decide the website is trustworthy and you feel comfortable giving your email address, you will need to go to that website and change that temporary MailDrop email address.

MailDrop does block spam, so incoming mail travels through multiple spam filters. You should not be seeing an inbox full of junk mail. Mail coming from websites with bad reputations for spam production is blocked. Only valid email servers are allowed, so any messages not meeting that criteria are not delivered to the MailDrop inbox. In addition, the site checks message subjects to be certain the same message is not repeated multiple times.  

 

Check out the MailDrop website to see how easy it is to use.

 

Sandy is an InvestEd Inc. director and serves as vice president for education. She is lead editor and prepares the general program brochure for the conference. Sandy has helped form investment clubs, presented introductory investing programs, and taught stock study and mutual fund classes at local, regional, and national events. In her leisure time she participates in a line dance group, plays handbells, bridge, and golf, and enjoys a variety of other activities, including investing. Sandy is professor emeritus of kinesiology, Georgia Southern University.





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