InvestEd 2014: Southern California Dreaming
August 2013 Webinar: Annuities: Good, Not so Good, or Bad?
The Face of an Investment Fraud Victim
SkyDrive

 

 

InvestEd 2014
Irvine CA, June 6-8, 2014
Irvine Marriott


Southern California Dreaming
While the InvestEd team is creating the 2014 conference curriculum, we invite you to visit the InvestEd 2014 tourism page and explore the wide variety of activities in the greater Orange County area. Adults and young people will find activities that appeal to history buffs, outdoor enthusiasts, museum attendees, music lovers, sports fans, and much more. Shopping and restaurant choices are abundant.

 

Early Registration Savings, $25 Rebate Offer, and Guest Room Discount
Early bird InvestEd 2014 registration is $369 and includes all conference activities, including five meals: breakfast and lunch on Saturday and Sunday plus dinner on Saturday. Full-time students with a valid school identification card pay $359. Register now.

 

Attend InvestEd 2014 and receive a $25 referral rebate when you bring friends or family members who did not attend InvestEd 2013. A referral must provide your name when registering and both of you must attend InvestEd 2014. After the 2014 conference, you will receive a $25 rebate for each person you refer who attended the conference. Spread the word about the InvestEd brand of quality investor education, encourage your friends to attend, and rack up your rebates.

 

InvestEd attendees pay only $99 plus tax for a room in the InvestEd room block at the Irvine Marriott. Rooms in the block receive discounted rates on guest room Internet access and overnight self parking. Book your room early. A limited number of rooms are available.

 

Super-charge your investing resolve and expand your skills in Irvine. Make your registration reservation early, and plan to meet up with other investors at InvestEd 2014 for Investor Education at Its Best.

 

 

InvestEd Inc. Free Webinar
Annuities: Good, Not so Good, or Bad?
Sunday, August 25, 2013
8:00 PM-9:00 PM ET / 5:00 PM-6:00 PM PT
Instructor: Bob Adams
Webinar Registration

 

A quote from Suze Orman pretty well sums it up: "Although there are certain instances in which buying an annuity may make sense, in a majority of cases I believe that annuities cause more harm than good." We'll look at both sides of the question in this webinar. When are circumstances right for you to own an annuity, when are they wrong, and why?

 

Register Now to attend the InvestEd Inc. free online investor education webinar. Space is limited.

 

Bob is an InvestEd instructor and teaches at local, regional, and national investor education events. A former InvestEd Inc. director, he is an associate director for the Puget Sound Chapter of BettterInvesting, a member of an online investment club, and past president of a local investment club. Bob creates innovative free spreadsheets and identifies useful websites for streamlining stock research. His website, http://www.bob-adams.net, reflects his strong advocacy of long-term fundamental investing. He retired after 26 years in radio and television broadcasting and 13 years of college teaching.

 

 

The Face of an Investment Fraud Victim
Sandy Gallemore

 

Willie Sutton, the famous bank robber, is credited with saying he robbed banks "because that's where the money was." Sutton denied the statement, crediting it to an enterprising reporter. However, the concept remains attached to his name. Following that theory, one may infer that fraudsters go where the money is. That's where we come in!

 

Fraud victims have many faces, many of which look like ours. Recent research has highlighted characteristics of individuals who are targeted by fraudsters. Like the bank robber, fraudsters wanting to part people from their money look for those of us who actually have a little money. After all, what's the point of targeting people who have no money?

 

Millions of workers are reaching retirement age and are beginning to withdraw funds from sizeable nest egg 401(k) and IRA accounts. These people are prime targets and need to be vigilant.

 

If we asked an artist to sketch the face of a potential fraud victim, what would it look like? Research conducted on fraud and victims of fraud has surprised us by shattering the stereotype many of us have. The Center for Problem-Oriented Policing indicates: "The prevailing stereotype of elderly fraud victims is that they are poorly informed, socially isolated individuals – potentially suffering from mental deterioration – who cling to old-fashioned ideas of politeness and manners that interfere with their ability to detect fraud." Whoa! That doesn't sound like us!

 

SaveAndInvest.org, a project of the FINRA Investor Education Foundation , paints a different picture. Potential victims of investment fraud tend to be optimistic and self-reliant in decision making, and they tend to be open to hearing new ideas about investing and making money. They are college-educated individuals with above average incomes and above average financial knowledge. Oh, oh! Now this is sounding more like us!

 

Potential fraud victims may be those who have experienced a financial setback and are trying to re-coup some of the loss. In current economic times, this scenario fits many people. The skilled fraudster is a con artist who is good at making something sound good, but not "too good to be true." Fraudsters know how to get us to reveal more personal information than we should. They learn about our health status, our family, and so forth, so they know exactly how to persuade us to participate in their scheme. Many smart people fall victim to the persuasion.

 

Be alert. All of us are at risk of encountering a fraudster. We should report suspicious sales pitches to FINRA Complaints, to the SEC Office of Investor Education and Advocacy, and/or to the North American Securities Administrators Association.

 

Sandy is an InvestEd Inc. director and serves as secretary. She is lead editor and prepares the general program brochure for the InvestEd conference. Sandy, an O'Hara Award recipient, is a charter member and the current president of a local investment club. She has helped form investment clubs, presented introductory investing programs, and taught stock study classes at local and regional events. Sandy is professor emerita, Georgia Southern University.

 

 

SkyDrive
Sandy Gallemore

 

Microsoft's SkyDrive is a file storage service providing the user with the ability to edit most Microsoft Office documents in a browser. In this free program, which includes a default of seven gigabytes (7GB) of space, you may upload text documents, spreadsheets, or presentations and work with them in SkyDrive. For example, if you are working on a computer that does not have Excel, just upload your spreadsheet and then select "Edit in Excel Web App" in the Edit Documents menu.

 

This program is similar to Dropbox and Google Drive, and it may be used on a PC, Mac, smartphone, or on a tablet. While a download is available, SkyDrive is accessible as an online service through the Web with no download required.

 

A recycle bin is included in SkyDrive. It operates in a similar fashion to the recycle bin on your Windows computer, with some important exceptions. The files you send to the recycle bin in SkyDrive may remain in the recycle bin for as few as three days and as many as 30 days, depending on your maximum SkyDrive space. So, decisions about what goes into that spot cannot be delayed too long. An undo option also is available.

 

SkyDrive does have an upload limit. The user cannot upload a single file of more than 2GB, regardless of available space. For larger files, you will need a different file storage service.

 

Files on SkyDrive may be opened in the equivalent Microsoft Office application, allowing for simultaneous editing by you and others who may be working on the same document. All versions of the document will be synchronized every time someone saves it in SkyDrive.

 

The variety of apps available for SkyDrive includes those for your Windows desktop, as well as for your Windows Phone, Mac, iPad,iPhone, and Android. An app which can replace notepad is OneNote, which helps you stay organized. For those who use Outlook, the Xobni app allows easy access of SkyDrive files from your email program and permits the sending of very large files to others. For Android users, the Browser for SkyDrive allows you to access and manage SkyDrive files from your phone.

 

Check out the free SkyDrive file storage service and available apps for enhanced service. It even includes an app for recipes, should you want some great ideas for a meal.

 

Sandy is an InvestEd Inc. director and serves as secretary. She is lead editor and prepares the general program brochure for the InvestEd conference. Sandy, an O'Hara Award recipient, is a charter member and the current president of a local investment club. She has helped form investment clubs, presented introductory investing programs, and taught stock study classes at local and regional events. Sandy is professor emerita, Georgia Southern University.

 

Questions? Contact InvestEd

 

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