InvestEd 2015
October 2014 Webinar: Options Part 4
The Stock Market and Stock Exchanges
Disposable Phone Numbers … Really?



InvestEd 2015
Richmond, VA, June 12-14, 2015
Hotel: Westin Richmond


Plan to join us for InvestEd 2015. Online registration is available now. Take the opportunity to make your hotel reservations at this time.

Conference sessions are in the planning stage. Two of those sessions will bring the knowledgeable Stock Rover gals Alex and Erica Reisman to InvestEd for the first time. They will join us for the weekend and are excited about attending Cyber Cafes where they will have an opportunity to interact with InvestEd attendees. Other new sessions will be on the schedule as well, along with some favorites from previous InvestEd conferences.

Mark your calendar for the November 7 newsletter where the session schedule will be available through a web link! Don't forget to check the InvestEd web site frequently for conference and other educational opportunities.


InvestEd Inc. Free Webinar
Options Part 4

Sunday, October 26, 2014
8:00 PM-9:00 PM ET / 5:00 PM-6:00 PM PT
Instructor: Saul Seinberg
Webinar Registration

In October, Saul will discuss basic option spreads and why they are popular, including their use as a defined risk limiting option tactic. The tradeoffs between conventional puts and calls and spreads, such as capital requirements and diversification, will be addressed together with a few spread trading tips. The October webinar also will delve into strategies for identifying suitable candidates on which to trade options, a topic rarely discussed in detail in option literature and trade journals.

Attendees may review webinar recordings for the previous parts of the series by logging into InvestEd's Online Education.

Register now to attend this InvestEd Inc. free online investor education webinar. Space is limited.

Saul SeinbergSaul is an InvestEd Inc. advisory director and a conference instructor. A former vice president for education of InvestEd, he teaches at local through national investor education events. With degrees in electrical engineering and law, Saul spent most of his career as a corporate attorney. In addition, he served as an adjunct professor at Albany Law School in New York.



The Stock Market and Stock Exchanges
Sandy Gallemore


The term "stock market" is a general term that refers to all stock exchanges where we may trade stocks. If we look around the world, we find many exchanges exist. Here in the United States, although a good number of exchanges exist, we tend to look at the two major exchanges, the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the NASDAQ, and refer to them as "the stock market" or just "the market." Most stocks in which we would be interested are included on one of these exchanges.

Our stock exchanges make buying and selling stocks easy for both professional investors and individual investors. If we did not have these exchanges, our ability to buy and sell stocks would be much more difficult. We might need to place an ad in a newspaper (or more than one newspaper) and wait for someone to express interest in selling us his or her stock or wait until someone called us to say he or she would like to buy the stock we want to sell. Our current stock exchanges allow us to exchange our money and stocks more quickly than we can read this sentence!

Certainly, another advantage of a stock exchange is its ability to track the constantly fluctuating prices of stocks on that particular exchange. We are able to watch our stocks second by second and see how they go up and down throughout the day. We may hear news about our company or about the economy as a whole and want to know how our company is reacting. The exchanges make this easy.

Most of us simply go online to our broker or to a discount brokerage firm, provide a ticker symbol, indicate how many shares to buy or to sell, and click away. We don't even need to identify the stock exchange. But, perhaps you are interested in knowing just a little about how the NYSE and NASDAQ differ from each other and how they work. Two online articles may be of interest in learning exactly what happens when we buy a stock. The Yahoo Finance article is just one of a number of articles about stocks. The online website Investopedia has an interesting article about how stocks trade among its many investing articles.

The NYSE, sometimes referred to as "the big board," was founded in 1792. In 2007, it merged with Euronext to form the first global equities exchange. The trading action for many years after the founding of the NYSE took place on a trading floor where traders interacted in face-to-face fashion. Today, those trades take place primarily on computer screens. You may read more about the exchange on Wikipedia.

The NASDAQ, founded in 1971 as the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations, is the other major exchange and is the world's first electronic stock market. Over 3300 stocks enjoy trading on the NASDAQ, which has the highest trading volume of the United States stock exchanges. In its earlier years, the NASDAQ was comprised of smaller companies, many of which were technology related. Today, many larger companies also trade on this exchange.

Until recently, investors had an easy method of determining if a stock was traded on the NYSE or the NASDAQ. NYSE stocks used one, two, or three letters for their ticker. NASDAQ stocks used four or five letters. However, about five years ago, the NYSE received permission for companies to use four-letter ticker symbols. While a few companies did change their symbols, the cost associated with changing symbols has been a deterrent for most.

Many stock exchanges are located around the world. Our NYSE and NASDAQ undoubtedly are the largest in volume, but they represent only a fraction of the total number of markets. Both the NYSE and the NASDAQ include a number of international companies that trade in the United States as well as elsewhere in the world.

Sandy is an InvestEd Inc. director and serves as vice president for education. She is lead editor and prepares the general program brochure for the conference. Sandy has helped form investment clubs, presented introductory investing programs, and taught stock study and mutual fund classes at local, regional, and national events. In her leisure time she participates in a line dance group, plays handbells, bridge, and golf, and enjoys a variety of other activities, including investing. Sandy is professor emeritus of kinesiology, Georgia Southern University.


Disposable Phone Numbers … Really?
Sandy Gallemore


Kim Komando always comes up with interesting tech information. A recent posting let us know we may obtain a disposable phone number, one we may want to use when pressed for our phone number, perhaps on a website. Many of us may be a little uncomfortable sharing our phone number with people we do not know, wanting to avoid letting everyone in the world know how to contact us. Yes, we can find an app that will help us be a little anonymous and maintain a little privacy where our phone number is concerned.

One app I found interesting is RingMeMaybe, an iPhone app that generates a temporary, disposable phone number for you when you want to maintain your privacy, but also make yourself available on a short-term basis. Since it may be used anywhere in the world, it may be an ideal choice for someone to use when calling you while you are in a foreign country. Calls coming to that number come through the app, and that app keeps a list of received calls, so users may review those at any time. The RingMeMaybe app is not for calling out, but for providing a phone number to others when they want to call you. Because the app connects through Wi-Fi, users may receive calls from around world, without accumulating any roaming fees.

A short video on the How It Works section of the website provides information about the app. Upon clicking on the Download link, I see a description of the app, compatibility issues, and reviews. Check out Alex Botteri, co-founder of RingMeMaybe in a YouTube video explaining more about the app. A real United States phone number is generated immediately, and that number lasts for seven days, although a pause option is available to temporarily disable the number. Users need not use the number the entire seven days. They may delete the number if no longer needed.

Your first download of the app includes 20 credits, which generates two free temporary phone numbers. Additional credits may be purchased for a nominal cost. Credits may be used for additional phone numbers or for extending the default expiration time of an existing number. All incoming calls are free, but any cost to connect to a phone service is the responsibility of the user.

Notable features of the RingMeMaybe app are below:

You may generate your first two disposable phone numbers without any cost. Each phone number is active for seven days. Users may purchase additional time and generate additional numbers.

RingMeMaybe serves as visual voicemail. Callers not reaching you may leave a message that you will be able to identify and listen to at a time convenient to you. In addition, you have access to a calls history.

Users may block a number temporarily by using the Pause feature provided by the app. This will result in the caller receiving a message that the number called is not in service. At any time, that Pause of a number may be lifted.

Deleting a phone number you have been using is easy. When your use of the number is over, simply delete that number. If someone calls the number, that person will receive a message indicating the number no longer is in use.

A helpful feature of RingMeMaybe is tagging numbers so you have an immediate indication about who is calling. While the app may not give you a name, it may identify the person as "Golf club for sale," for example.

Users have the option of adding time to the seven days the app provides for a given phone number. If you want to keep that number longer, you have the option to add time before the week is over. Each extension lasts seven days.

The mission of the San Francisco-based company RingMeMaybe is to "…solve the privacy issues in person-to-person and person-to-crowd mobile engagement." Give the website a look and see if the app might be useful to you.

Sandy is an InvestEd Inc. director and serves as vice president for education. She is lead editor and prepares the general program brochure for the conference. Sandy has helped form investment clubs, presented introductory investing programs, and taught stock study and mutual fund classes at local, regional, and national events. In her leisure time she participates in a line dance group, plays handbells, bridge, and golf, and enjoys a variety of other activities, including investing. Sandy is professor emeritus of kinesiology, Georgia Southern University.



Questions? Contact InvestEd

InvestEd Inc. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation.

Facebook.com/InvestEdInc
Twitter.com/InvestEdInc
LinkedIn.com/company/invested-inc-
Gplus.to/InvestEdInc

Copyright 2011-2017 by InvestEd, Inc.            Privacy Policy